By Alvin Earl Espina

Tests, quizzes, exams, and so many other words to describe such trepid time, the time where our hands go sweaty and clammy, and our minds on the brink of explosion, and our memories stop working when we really need them. Tests are what we call the bane of the end-product of discussions.

Whether it be long quizzes or short tests, all of these tests are quite difficult especially if we didn’t study or we lack confidence in ourselves after.

bosconians-in-classThe denotative meaning of the word “test” is “a time where people often take as a result of a particular subject learnt and often placed into competition.”

But is it really true that these tests are competition? Do we need to fear these so-called tests and quizzes because they are the basis of competition in the intellectual level of the school itself?

Fear not, my fellow students, for we have gathered a lot of information on how to survive tests. These came from faraway lands, from the exchange of tongues and probably the internet.

These got compiled by someone (yours truly) who has wanted to save a lot of people suffering from cramming and procrastination.

1  Be Prepared

study-jpgPreparing does cost time; but for the exam, it is an extremely crucial piece of advice that a lot of people might have given to you a lot of times in your life already.

If I want to achieve something, should I sacrifice that better outcome by doing the thing I want to do in the present?

Everything we do now is temporary, no matter how fun it might seem now, it will just fade away in the sands of time and the glimpses of memory.

Doing something productive like preparing for your exams is pretty important if you want to survive school.

2  Stop Stressing

stressed-at-testAt first glance, it looks like it contradicts with the first advice. Actually, this doesn’t just mean “sitting back and relaxing.”

It means “don’t overthink with the tests ahead of you.” It doesn’t do anything good to your health – you wouldn’t want your precious face to be ruined by a scowl, don’t you?

So if you think you are confident on what you’ve learned during your “preparing” sessions, then stop stressing over it.

Stressing during exams is what make people forget what they’ve learned because they just can’t get over the things they’ve remembered.

3  Cheating is not a “LIFE”-saver.

cheatingWell if it does you any justice, cheating is probably what everyone will try to convince you to do. However, cheating does not make you learn anything and would just develop you into a bad character.

Of course, you just want to pass this course or subject and get over it because it’s not needed in the real world.

Let me tell you one thing we’ve learned when we were working (that information is classified), it’s that people don’t look at your credentials or achievements.

Sure it adds to your bling of a record, but people will mostly hire you for your personality. And cheating does not help develop your character and personality, since once you are caught red-handed It’ll make you smell and look bad.

4  I did my best but…

failingLife may not be as you may have so expected. You may have done everything – like all the steps mentioned above – but it still seems the universe is against you.

Failing is just a part of our lives. Failing might sound bad, but truly it’s the one that motivated the great ones to achieve greatness – it’s the one that molded them into becoming into the legends they’re known for today.

So failing today might be the worst thing across your day, but if you know that you did your best, then, at least, there’s a little bit of satisfaction left within you.

success

Now that we have passed on this knowledge, make sure to use it wisely. People constantly change every day, and if you can’t change quickly enough, then it most likely you’ll be left alone.

The world doesn’t stop for us just because something bad happened, so chin up and face the world and show them what you’re made of, dear students, especially to the tests and quizzes you’re about to face.

gates

Bosconian Odyssey, Vol. 18 (No. 1), December 2016: 22-23.
ERRATUM ♦ The publication credited this article to another author as this got published in the magazine. We sincerely apologize for this inadvertent mistake.
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